Malibu Complete GETTING AROUND MALIBU: LA COSTA

Getting Around Malibu: La Costa Hills

Beautiful landside homes line Rambla Vista, in the La Costa neighborhood overlooking PCH and the beach, just west of Las Flores Canyon.Copyright MalibuComplete.com
Beautiful landside homes line Rambla Vista, in the La Costa neighborhood overlooking PCH and the beach, just west of Las Flores Canyon.

La Costa Neighborhood: Landside

The hillside neighborhood of La Costa, the oldest subdivision in Malibu, dates back to 1926. The neighborhood's CC&Rs, which expired around 1970, required architectural review and approval of all development.

View downhill from La Costa, with PCH, the beach homes and ocean always in view.Copyright MalibuComplete.com
View downhill from La Costa, with PCH, beach homes and ocean always in view.

The area is predominately single-family residential built along narrow winding streets and on steep hillsides. On the north sides of the roads, structures are built up the hillsides primarily; obvious cuts into the hillside are infrequent. On the south sides of the roads, structures are built down the hillsides or rest on pilings. Most structures have very little or no setback from the roads. The original homes are primarily Mission Revival in design. However, since the expiration of the CC&Rs, an eclectic mix of design has emerged. Telephone lines are underground. Most homes have ocean views. La Costa now includes single-family built later along Pacific Coast Highway and these homes have setbacks.

Malibu's original mixed-use strip center is located between Rambla Pacifico and Rambla Vista on Pacific Coast Highway. In the past, the first floor was commercial while the second floor was residential. Today, the first floor is commercial/retail; the second floor is commercial/office. The first-floor businesses serve both residents and visitors.

On the east end of Rambla Vista, housing is primarily multi-family with five duplexes and one eight-unit apartment building.

Because of the age of the area, trees have reached enormous heights but enhance the hillside neighborhood's beauty. Vegetation is natural. Three historic structures are located on Pacific Coast Highway. Representing the Mission Revival style in design, one structure, referred to as the old Sheriffs station, is made of brick, the other two, at the La Costa neighborhood shopping area, are stucco. All have tile roofs and in some rooms, original Malibu tile.

Open space is visual, due in large portion to the topography, and privately owned.

The noise level is tranquil, except for the homes which are built along Pacific Coast Highway.

The eastern half of La Costa has experienced slope movement. Gas lines are above ground. Rambla Orienta, Paseo Hidalgo, and Calle de Barco, at the northern top of the neighborhood, are dewatered. Due to sliding in 1984, some houses on the east end of Rambla Orienta were destroyed, or remain but are uninhabitable.

Across PCH is the neighborhood of La Costa Beach which has distinct characteristics and values.

Sources: Information on this page was adapted from the City of Malibu, General Plan, November 1995

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